Markets

Like many Asian countries, street markets are a big part of Taiwanese life. While you can buy all your food from a grocery store on any day of the week, the markets are a cornucopia of variety: fruit, vegetables, herbs, spices, meat, bedding, clothes, shoes and underwear, as well as street food stalls, tea shops and snacks like nuts and dried fruit.

In Changhua, there are two notable markets that we have encountered (so far). The morning market on Changshou St (and surrounds) is particularly good for fresh produce. It suffers from being on the street and so vehicle traffic competes with pedestrian traffic, making it a bit difficult and dangerous to navigate, but the sprawling lines of stalls and stands means you can virtually never see the whole market. Prices are generally excellent, but we’ve found that smaller stalls will give you a much better deal than larger stalls, because they value their reputation and customer relationships more. However, “tourist prices” can be a problem, so we try to only shop at stall where the prices are clearly displayed. Learning to understand numbers in Chinese has been helpful too, as people will generally warm to you quite quickly if you have even a smattering of Chinese! Haggling is an acceptable practice at markets, but it requires a level of confidence neither of us has in English, let alone Chinese. Complimenting a store keeper on a good price is also a good thing to do, but it can take a while to work out what a “good price” is.

The Night Market on Yong’an St is even listen on Google Maps as a point of interest. This market is more like a fair in many ways.There are carnival style games where you can win prizes, stalls selling cheap electronics and factory shop clothes and even pop-up pet shops. Most of the food stalls sell snack food or ready made meals, ranging from sushi, to sweet potato chips, to western style braised steak. We are slightly cautious here, because there are a number of stalls selling traditional dishes such as offal and blood sausages, and it’s not always immediately obvious what anything is. If you don’t like crowded places, then the Night Market is not ideal because you are obliged to move with the flow of people, unless you are stopping to buy. There is very little space for standing around if you are indecisive, and all of the seating area seems to belong to specific stalls, so if you aren’t eating their food you don’t seem to be able to sit there. The stall owners are very friendly on the whole and will try to explain their products to you as best as possible, and if you are confused of indecisive they often see it as their own fault. Again, you can haggle prices, but the market is quite loud, so it can be difficult to hear. Once you get familiar with the market it becomes easy to get a routine going, because the stalls are fairly consistent week-after-week, so if you are going to be in Changhua for a while, it can become a real feature of your Thursday nights!

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